ericscissorhands:

coolthingsswd:

Ode to Apollo 11 and the joy of discovery

If you’ve seen the teaser trailer for Interstellar, its damn near impossible to NOT read this in Matthew McConaughey’s voice/accent. lolz.

siddharthasmama:

gallifreyglo:

dichotomized:

U.S. Martin Luther King Jr being attacked as he marched nonviolently for the Chicago Freedom Movement, 1966, which was the most ambitious civil rights campaign in the North of the United States, and lasted from mid-1965 to early 1967.

If only he’d been well-spoken, pulled his pants up and didn’t wear a hoodie… oop… wait…

Please really look at this. Look at how many men are on him. Look at how you can see he is not attacking anyone. Look at how he is dressed. Imagine the fear he has that this moment may have been his last. Remember that he was assassinated by forces within the U.S. gov’t because of his mission. Before you pull that string on that MLK Jr. watered-down quote teddy, look at this, look at what’s happening today, and really fucking think.

siddharthasmama:

gallifreyglo:

dichotomized:

U.S. Martin Luther King Jr being attacked as he marched nonviolently for the Chicago Freedom Movement, 1966, which was the most ambitious civil rights campaign in the North of the United States, and lasted from mid-1965 to early 1967.

If only he’d been well-spoken, pulled his pants up and didn’t wear a hoodie… oop… wait…

Please really look at this. Look at how many men are on him. Look at how you can see he is not attacking anyone. Look at how he is dressed. Imagine the fear he has that this moment may have been his last. Remember that he was assassinated by forces within the U.S. gov’t because of his mission. Before you pull that string on that MLK Jr. watered-down quote teddy, look at this, look at what’s happening today, and really fucking think.

femmerenaissance:

Vera Rubin (b. 1928)

When Vera Cooper Rubin told her high school physics teacher that she’d been accepted to Vassar, he said, “That’s great. As long as you stay away from science, it should be okay.”
Rubin graduated Phi Beta Kappa in 1948, the only astronomy major in her class at Vassar, and went on to receive her master’s from Cornell in 1950 (after being turned away by Princeton because they did not allow women in their astronomy program) and her Ph.D. from Georgetown in 1954. Now a senior researcher at the Carnegie Institute’s Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Rubin is credited with proving the existence of “dark matter,” or nonluminous mass, and forever altering our notions of the universe. She did so by gathering irrefutable evidence to persuade the astronomical community that galaxies spin at a faster speed than Newton’s Universal Law of Gravitation allows. As a result of this finding, astronomers conceded that the universe must be filled with more material than they can see. 
Rubin made a name for herself not only as an astronomer but also as a woman pioneer; she fought through severe criticisms of her work to eventually be elected to the National Academy of Sciences (at the time, only three women astronomers were members) and to win the highest American award in science, the National Medal of Science. Her master’s thesis, presented to a 1950 meeting of the American Astronomical Society, met with severe criticism, and her doctoral thesis was essentially ignored, though her conclusions were later validated. “Fame is fleeting,” Rubin said when she was elected to the National Academy of Sciences. “My numbers mean more to me than my name. If astronomers are still using my data years from now, that’s my greatest compliment.”


 Sources:
1. http://innovators.vassar.edu/innovator.html?id=68; http://science.vassar.edu/women/
2. http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/45424

femmerenaissance:

Vera Rubin (b. 1928)


When Vera Cooper Rubin told her high school physics teacher that she’d been accepted to Vassar, he said, “That’s great. As long as you stay away from science, it should be okay.”

Rubin graduated Phi Beta Kappa in 1948, the only astronomy major in her class at Vassar, and went on to receive her master’s from Cornell in 1950 (after being turned away by Princeton because they did not allow women in their astronomy program) and her Ph.D. from Georgetown in 1954. Now a senior researcher at the Carnegie Institute’s Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Rubin is credited with proving the existence of “dark matter,” or nonluminous mass, and forever altering our notions of the universe. She did so by gathering irrefutable evidence to persuade the astronomical community that galaxies spin at a faster speed than Newton’s Universal Law of Gravitation allows. As a result of this finding, astronomers conceded that the universe must be filled with more material than they can see. 

Rubin made a name for herself not only as an astronomer but also as a woman pioneer; she fought through severe criticisms of her work to eventually be elected to the National Academy of Sciences (at the time, only three women astronomers were members) and to win the highest American award in science, the National Medal of Science. Her master’s thesis, presented to a 1950 meeting of the American Astronomical Society, met with severe criticism, and her doctoral thesis was essentially ignored, though her conclusions were later validated. “Fame is fleeting,” Rubin said when she was elected to the National Academy of Sciences. “My numbers mean more to me than my name. If astronomers are still using my data years from now, that’s my greatest compliment.”

 Sources:

1. http://innovators.vassar.edu/innovator.html?id=68; http://science.vassar.edu/women/

2. http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/45424

infinity-imagined:

Sunsets and sunrises seen from the International Space Station.

(Source: eol.jsc.nasa.gov)

(Source: ssabi45)

To believe in a universe as young as six or seven thousand years old is to extinguish the light from most of the galaxy. Not to mention, the light from all the hundred billion other galaxies in the observable universe.

(Source: demoncolbert)

historywars:

Battle of the Bulge: U.S. troops under way in the region of Saint-Vith, 24 January 1945.

historywars:

Battle of the Bulge: U.S. troops under way in the region of Saint-Vith, 24 January 1945.

spaceplasma:

As Voyager 1 flew by Jupiter in 1979, it captured the planet’s most obvious visible feature; the Great Red Spot. The Great Red Spot is an anticyclonic (high- pressure) storm that can be likened to the worst hurricanes on Earth. Cyclones develop due to the Coriolis effect where the lower latitudes travel faster than the higher latitudes producing a net spin on a pressure zone. The detailed structure in Jupiter’s atmosphere is dominated by physics known as fluid mechanics. Note that the atmosphere of Jupiter is so dense and cold that it behaves as a fluid rather than a gas. On Earth, the energy to power our storm systems comes from sunlight. Jupiter is too far from the Sun and receives very little energy. The energy needed to power all the turbulence in Jupiter’s atmosphere comes from heat released from the planet’s core.

Credit: James Schombert, NASA/JPL

from-the-earth-to-the-moon13:

Apollo 10 Enters Lunar Orbit (21 May 1969)

kenobi-wan-obi:

NGC 1300 by Steven Marx

A barred spiral galaxy about 61 million light-years away in the constellation Eridanus. The galaxy is about 110,000 light-years across; just slightly larger than our own galaxy, the Milky Way. It is a member of the Eridanus Cluster, a cluster of 200 galaxies. [**]

kenobi-wan-obi:

NGC 1300 by Steven Marx

A barred spiral galaxy about 61 million light-years away in the constellation Eridanus. The galaxy is about 110,000 light-years across; just slightly larger than our own galaxy, the Milky Way. It is a member of the Eridanus Cluster, a cluster of 200 galaxies. [**]

(Source: afro-dominicano)